Scripture Union of Malawi

Scripture Union of Malawi

Scripture Union in Malawi (SUM), is part of an international interdenominational Christian organization that works with children, young people and families in schools and churches with the aim of encouraging reading of the Bible. The parent organization was founded in England by Josiah Spiers in 1867 when he began informally telling children stories from the Bible. The ministry quickly grew leading to the formation of the Children’s Special Service Mission (CSSM), which began to distribute Bible reading cards. By 1893, CSSM had distributed 13 million children’s leaflets in fifty languages all around the world. The name was changed to Scripture Union in 1960 and has now grown in over 140 countries.

SUM was formally established in Malawi in December 1970 by Ralph and Jane Hanger. As there was already an organization working with secondary schools, SUM initially concentrated on working with young people who had left school and had moved into the towns. Over the years, it has been involved in a number of activities including establishing Bible clubs/study groups across Malawi, holding annual youth camps, and distributing Bible reading aids and other Christian literature.

References

Contributors
  • Mark Loomis

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The Evangelical Alliance Mission: Hunyani Mission

The Evangelical Alliance Mission

Hunyani Mission

 

The Evangelical Alliance Mission (T.E.A.M.) opened up the Hunyani Mission station in 1948 in the Zambezi Valley near the Mozambique boarder, approximately 130 miles North of Salisbury (Harare). T.E.A.M. missionaries Les and Lillian Austin were at Hunyani from 1951 to 1954.

Betty Wolfe, at Hunyani along with her husband John during their “second term” as T.E.A.M. missionaries in Southern Rhodesia in the late 1950’s/early 1960’s, describes descending into the valley during the hot season and being hit with a wave of heat “like an oven door being opened in our faces.” Their mission house at Hunyani “had an asbestos roof with no ceiling over the kitchen and dining/living room, which made it rather like an oven.” One year they hung a thermometer outside in the shade, and “it registered 110 degrees [Fahrenheit] every day for a month. In the middle of the night it cooled down to 96.”

At one point, the mission contained a medical clinic and was a base for language training of other T.E.A.M. missionaries. The mission was still open as of the Bush War. The mission’s current status is unknown.

Reference

Contributors
  • Mark Loomis

Cinderellas: The Daughters of Wisdom – Au Profit des Missions Montfortaines

The Daughters of Wisdom

Au Profit des Missions Montfortaines (Filles de la Sagesse)

Details

  • Date of Issue:
  • Designer: 
  • Printer: Delrieu
  • Process: 
  • Paper:
  • Perf: 
  • Sheet:
  • Booklet: 1 pane (2 x 10)
  • Quantity:

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Roman Catholic Church: Montfort Missionaries – The Daughters of Wisdom

Montfort Missionaries

The Daughters of Wisdom

The Daughters of Wisdom is a group belonging to the Montfort Missionaries. They arrived in British Central Africa in 1904 and continue assisting in the development of health and education sectors in Malawi.

Cinderellas

Postcards

References

Roman Catholic Church: Montfort Missionaries

Roman Catholic Church

Montfort Missionaries

 

The Montfort Missionaries is a missionary religious congregation within the Roman Catholic Church. The community was founded by Saint Louis de Montfort in 1705. The congregation is made up of priests and brothers who serve both in the native lands and in other countries.

The Montfortian Family comprises three groups:

The Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith confided evangelization of British Central Africa to the missionaries of the Company of Mary.

On 28th June, 1901, the first three missionaries of the Montfort Fathers arrived at Blantyre and on 25th July began their first mission in Angoniland. The Vicariate Apostolic of Nyasa, erected in 1897, had jurisdiction over part of modern Zambia and was entrusted to the Missionaries of Africa (White Fathers). A Vicariate was a form of territorial jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Church centered in missionary regions and countries where a diocese has not yet been established.

In 1903, the mission became the Prefecture Apostolic of Shire (a ‘pre-diocesan’ missionary jurisdiction where the Catholic Church is not yet sufficiently developed to have it made a diocese) and was formed from the The Vicariate Apostolic of Nyasa (who had jurisdiction over parts of modern Zambia and was entrusted to the White Fathers).

One of the Monfort Missionaries, Rev. Father Prezeau, former missionary of the Diocese of Kingston, Canada, was elected the first Apostolic prefect. Already four stations had been founded, and numerous schools established in all directions spread the Christian doctrine.

On 14 April 1908, Pope Pius X erected the prefecture into the Apostolic Vicariate of Shire.

Cinderellas

Postcards

Roman Catholic Church: Archdiocese of Lusaka

Roman Catholic Church

Archdiocese of Lusaka

The Vicariate Apostolic of Lusaka was elevated to an archdiocese on 25 April 1959. The first Archbishop was Adam Kozłowiecki (1911-2007) of the Society of Jesus.

References

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Diocese of Hwange: Holy Family Parish

Diocese of Hwange

Holy Family Parish

 

In 1936, St Mary’s Lukozhe was moved to establish St. Mary’s Mission. From St. Mary’s the Mariannhill missionaries visited regularly Hwange where the school of St. Ignatius and the parish were more effectively served.

The earliest details of the parish of the Holy Family go back to 1938. However, it appears to formally exist from 1951. The Holy Family Parish was one of four urban parishes in Wankie.

References

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Roman Catholic Church: Diocese of Hwange

Roman Catholic Church

Diocese of Hwange

The Prefecture of Wankie was cut off from the Apostolic Vicariate of Salisbury and Apostolic Vicariate Bulawayo and was erected on 29 June 1953 and confided to the Fathers of the Spanish Mission Institute (SMI). On 1 March 1963, the Prefecture of Hwange became a Diocese.

On 3 July 1991, the civil district of Gokwe, the area of Omay between the Sengwa and Sanyati rivers in the Kariba district, and the area of the Nkayi district north of the Shangani river, were cut from the Diocese of Hwange and formed into the Diocese of Gokwe.

The Diocese of Hwange comprises the following civil districts: Hwange, Binga, and the part of Lupane north of the Shabula River. It is bounded on the North by Zambezi River, on the West by Botswana, on the East by the civil districts of Omay, Gokwe, Lupane and on the South by Nyamandlovu.

Parish

  • Holy Family
  • Our Lady of Peace
  • Ss Peter and Paul
  • St Charles Lwanga
  • St Francis Xavier
  • St George
  • St Joachim
  • St Joseph
  • St Josephine Bakhita
  • St Kizito
  • St Monica
  • St Teresa

Missions

  • All Souls
  • Holy Cross
  • Mary Inmaculate
  • Our Lady of Fatima
  • Sacred Heart
  • St John the Baptist (Dandanda)
  • St John the Baptist (Makwa)
  • St John Vianney
  • St Martin de Porres
  • St Mary’s
  • St Teresa of the Child Jesus

References

The Evangelical Alliance Mission: Evangelical Bible School

The Evangelical Alliance Mission

Evangelical Bible School

The Evangelical Alliance Mission (T.E.A.M.) has a long history of training church leaders in the Zambezi Valley, Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe), beginning 1953 at Mavhuradonha Mission. Two years later, training was moved to Kapfunde Mission. A school was completed in 1955, consisting of a classroom and ten thatched huts to house families of the students. Instruction became co-educational in 1956. A certificate in Theology, a three-year secondary level program, was begun in 1987, along with a post-secondary level three-year diploma in Theology.

The school continued to grow to where a new facility was needed and was relocated to Sinoia (Chinhoyi) in 1969, where it became known as the Evangelical Bible School (college). The new school was constructed at a cost of £36,000, with most of the funds coming from the United States of America. Desiring to be closer to a larger base of potential students, the Evangelical Bible School/College relocated to Harare in 1991, to become the present Harare Theological College (HTC).

References

Contributor
  • Mark Loomis

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Dutch Reformed Church: Margaretha Hugo School for the Blind

Dutch Reformed Church

Margaretha Hugo School for the Blind

The Margaretha Hugo School for the Blind (commonly known as Copata School for the Blind) had its origins when the parents of a blind boy approached Dutch Reformed Church missionary Reverend Hugo at Chibi Mission for help. Rev. Hugo asked his wife, Margaretha, to look after the boy and she replied “I will try,” from which was born the later motto of the Margaretha Hugo Mission – “We will try.”Soon, there were 8 children in her care. Margaretha later went to South Africa to learn how to teach Braille.

Established in 1915, the school was registered as a school in 1927 as the first school in Southern Rhodesia providing services to students with disabilities. Because of challenges with accessibility, the school was moved to the Zimuto Mission farm in 1938.

From its initial founding, the school has grown to include a primary and secondary boarding school supporting 480 students with disabilities, most of them with visual impairments, coming from across Southern Africa. The school has a staff of 35 primary and 14 secondary school teachers and continues to be managed by the Reformed Church in Zimbabwe (RCZ).

References

Contributors
  • Mark Loomis
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