Barclays Bank of Zambia Ltd: Luanshya

Barclays Bank of Zambia Ltd

Luanshya

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Barclays Bank of Zambia Ltd

Barclays Bank of Zambia Ltd

Barclays Bank (Dominion, Colonial and Overseas) was incorporated locally as Barclays Bank of Zambia on 1 October 1971, a wholly owned subsidiary, by which time there were 27 full branches.

In 1996, the Connect debit card was launched. In the year of its launch, over 2,500 cards were issued, and later in 1997, Connect services were extended to the Copperbelt and eastern Province. In 2000 the banking community was surprised by the appointment of a woman, Margaret Mwanakatwe, as managing director.

In 2007 the Bank announced plans to open 30 Barclays Express prefabricated branches by the end of the year, along the lines of similar branches in other African countries where Barclays is present. By 2008, when the BBZ was named Best Bank in the Euromoney awards for excellence, there were 70 Barclays offices in Zambia employing 1,200 staff.

In 2009 Barclays launched Premier Banking in Zambia and in 2011 Barclays and UNICEF marked four years of their Building Young Futures partnership in Zambia, which has helped to empower more than half a million young people globally by providing opportunities to acquire the skills needed to achieve a better future.

Another partnership, with GlaxoSmithKline, was formed in 2013 with the aim of increasing access to affordable healthcare and medicines for the citizens of Zambia. This has since been developed with CARE International to create a social enterprise model for healthcare and entrepreneurship. By 2014 Zambia was the only country in Africa where all three of Barclays’ global community investment programmes were being delivered: Banking on Change, Spaces for Sports and Building Young Futures.

In 2012 Barclays and ABSA launched Barclays Life Zambia, offering customers a range of tailored insurance products. The same year saw Barclays named as Bank of the Year in Zambia by The Banker magazine. In 2013 Barclays undertook an innovative and ground breaking bond issue on behalf of the Zambian government. Also in 2013 it was announced that Barclays Zambia was to be incorporated into Barclays Africa Group, of which Barclays owns 62.3%. In 2016 Barclays announced plans for a progressive reduction of its shareholding in Barclays Africa Group Ltd.

Branches

References

Contributors
  • James Gavin
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Barclays Bank of Zambia Ltd: Kalulushi

Barclays Bank of Zambia Ltd

Kalulushi

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The International School of Lusaka

The International School of Lusaka

Ridgeway

The International School of Lusaka was established in 1963 as a non-denominational, co-educational, independent day school. The student body consists of 650 students, ranging from nursery to Year 13. The students represent over 50 different nationalities from six continents.

References

Contributors
  • James Gavin
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Alan Drysdall

Alan Drysdall

1934-2017

Alan Drysdall graduated, in 1954, with a first class honours degree in geology from Southampton University and after appropriate research, with a PhD in 1957. In August 1957, he took up a post with the Geological Survey of Northern Rhodesia, where he lived until 1975.

Alan had a distinguished career in Northern Rhodesia, latterly from about 1970 as director of the Zambian Geological Survey, which included having named after him (in 1961) a new genera of scalenodont, a mammal like reptile, Luangwa drysdalli (featured on a stamp released on 1st February 1973) and also, in 1973, having a new mineral species drysdallite named after him. After working on projects in Pakistan and Canada in November 1977 Alan accepted a post in Saudi Arabia, eventually retiring from there in 1990.

While in Lusaka Alan took up philately again and joined the Lusaka Philatelic Society and in 1971 the RSC and in 1974 the Royal Philatelic Society London. In 1976, his first book was published: The Stamps and Postal History of Northern Rhodesia and Zambia 1963-65, followed, in 1986: by The Nyasaland-Rhodesia Field Force 1914-18 (jointly with Kenneth Pennycuick), in 1988, by The Oates Correspondence; a Postal History of Frank Oates’ Travels in Matabeleland and Zambesia 1873-75 (jointly with Kenneth Wright) and, in 1990, Mashonaland; a Postal History 1890-96 (jointly with Dave Collis).

Since these early days Alan wrote prolifically for The Transvaal Philatelist, The Natal and Zululand Post (both of which he edited for many years), the London Philatelist, the Rhodesian Study Circle Journal and the RSC Handbook Memoir series, the South African Philatelist and Gibbons Stamp Monthly and others, and also written a number of books on Transvaal stamps. Indeed, the early Transvaal stamps were Alan’s main collecting interest, his collection winning many gold medals at National and International level before it was sold in 2006.

Alan’s preeminence in the world of philately was recognised by many honours, culminating in his signing of the Rolls of Honour in South Africa in 1995 and in England in 2003.

Alan Drysdall, President of the RSC 2011-14 and a Life Vice President, died on 11 January 2017.

References

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Postcards: Unity Press – Zambia Industrial and Mining Corporation Ltd.

Unity Press

Zambia Industrial and Mining Corporation Ltd.

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2002 – Centenary of Nobel Prizes

Zambia

2002 – Centenary of Nobel Prizes

Details

  • Date of Issue: 11th February, 2002
  • Date Withdrawn:
  • Date Invalidated:
  • Designer: R. Sauber
  • Printer: House of Questa
  • Process: Lithography
  • Paper:
  • Watermark: N/A
  • Perf: 14
  • Cylinders:
  • Sheet: N/A
  • Booklet: N/A
  • Quantity:
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2002 – Chinese New Year

Zambia

2002 – Chinese New Year

Details

  • Date of Issue: 18th February, 2002
  • Date Withdrawn:
  • Date Invalidated:
  • Designer: D. Kowk
  • Printer: Cartor
  • Process: Lithography
  • Paper:
  • Watermark: N/A
  • Perf: 13.5
  • Cylinders:
  • Sheet: 
  • Booklet: N/A
  • Quantity:
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Missionaries of Africa: Ipusukilo Mission

Missionaries of Africa

Ipusukilo Mission

 

The Missionaries of Africa (White Fathers) founded Ipusukilo mission in 1914, but it did not really get underway until after the conclusion of World War I.  The mission is located on the banks of the Lufubu river in the Luwingu District of Northern Province of Northern Rhodesia (Zambia).  The White Fathers transferred control of the mission to the Salesians (Roman Catholic religious order) in 1986.  The Salesians, in turn, handed the mission over to the local Kasama Archdiocese in 1992. 

The diocese continues to operate the mission, which includes the Ipusukilo mission school.

Postcards

References

  • Christian Missionaries and the Creation of Northern Rhodesia 1880-1924 – R.I. Rotberg
  • Salesian Newslink
Contributors
  • Mark Loomis
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Missionaries of Africa

Missionaries of Africa

The Society of Missionaries of Africa (Missionari d’ Africa) – also known as the “White Fathers” (Pères Blancs) – is a Roman Catholic international missionary society of priests and brothers founded in 1868 by the first Archbishop of Algeria, later Cardinal Lavigerie. The name “White Fathers” comes from their religious habit (dress), which resembles the traditional clothing worn in North Africa – a white tunic (gandoura) and hooded cape (burnoose). Their sole missionary focus is Africa – primarily central Africa. 

In 1878 its members founded the first Catholic missions in the Rift Valley lakes region of then German East Africa (present-day Burundi, Rwanda and large part of Tanzania).  From there, the White Fathers moved south and entered the high plateau of North-Eastern Rhodesia, beginning first with the Mambwe peoples in 1891.

Kayambi (Kayambe) Mission was established 1895, prior to the effective rule of the British South Africa Company.  The White Fathers next turned their attention to the more numerous Bemba (BaBemba) peoples.  Under the leadership of Bishop Dupont, the White Fathers sought influence with Chief Mwamba. Upon his death, they secured favorable access to the Bemba territory (sometimes referred to as “Bembaland”), establishing missions at Chilubula and Chilonga in 1899.

As of 2018, there were 1200 White Father missionaries in Africa.

Missions

Northern Rhodesia
  • 1895 – Kayambi
  • 1899 – Chilubula
  • 1899 – Chilonga
  • 1903 – Chilubi
  • 1905 – Kapatu
  • 1905 – Lubwe
  • 1914- Ipusukilo
  • 1922 – Rosa
  • 1922 – Malole

Postcards

References

Contributors
  • Mark Loomis
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