Ana Aslan

Ana Aslan

1897-1988

Ana Aslan was born 1st January, 1897. She was a Romanian biologist and physician who discovered the anti-aging effects of procaine, based on the drugs Gerovital H3 and Aslavital, which she developed. 

Aslan was considered a pioneer of social medicine. Years after becoming the head of the physiology department at the Institute of Endocrinology of Bucharest, she founded the Institute of Geriatrics of Bucharest in 1952. This institute was the first of its kind in the world and was recognized by the World Health Organization

She was known for coining the term “gerontology”, and in 1959 organized the Romanian Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics. The Romanian Society of Gerontology was the first in the world to channel its research into clinic, experimental, and social researches, devise a therapeutic strategy to prevent the process of aging, and organize and national health network for the prevention of aging.

Her drugs were used by many famous politicians and celebrities around the world, including John F. Kennedy. She died 20th May, 1988.

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  • James Gavin
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Samuel Joseph Curtis

Samuel Joseph Curtis

1898-1995

 

Samuel (Sam) Joseph Curtis was born March 1890 in North Carolina. His family later moved to the logging town of Winlock, Washington. He attended Washington State College (WSU) in Pullman, Washington, graduating in 1925 with degrees in agriculture and education.  His college studies were interrupted by enlistment in the US Army during World War I, stationed in Lyon, France.  He went on to receive his Masters Degree in Education from Columbia University in 1933, and in 1957 a Masters Degree in social work from the University of Washington.

Curtis married Elizabeth Williams in 1926.  They were commissioned by the Congregational Church and traveled to Southern Rhodesia to serve as missionaries at Mount Selinda Mission.  Sam worked as an agricultural specialist and principal of the Mount Selinda teacher training school.  Elizabeth taught home economics in nutrition, sewing and childcare to the women. The Curtis’ retuned home in 1939, after 12 years in Africa.

Sam had a number of “careers” upon his return.  He taught agriculture at a local high school; worked as an inspector at Boeing during WWII; and was a social worker with the Washington State Department of Public Assistance – eventually becoming Supervisor of the Children’s Division. 

After retiring in 1966, he helped organize the FISH Food Bank in Gig Harbor. Elizabeth died in 1972. Sam died June 1995.

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  • Mark Loomis
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Thomas King

Thomas King

1870-1947

 

Thomas King was born in Craigmore, Londonderry County, Ireland, August 1870.  He immigrated to the United States in 1893 at age 23.  King worked his way through Oberlin Academy, Oberlin College and the Theological Seminary, graduating 1900.  In May 1905, he was ordained at the Oberlin First Congregational Church.  A month later, he married Estelle Reed of Weeping Water, Nebraska.  At the time she was an instructor at the Oberlin Music Conservatory.  They left for Africa soon after to serve as missionaries with the American Board of Commissioners in Southern Rhodesia.

The Kings would serve at Mount Selinda and nearby Chikore Missions for the next 14 years.  Between 1908 and 1912, Rev. King taught and oversaw “industrial work” at Chikore while Mrs. King did evangelistic work among the women.  As of 1917-18, they were back at Selinda where Rev. King was in charge of the church, evangelism in the outstations and was mission treasurer.  Mrs. King taught music in the schools.

They retired from the American Board in 1920.  After a year’s furlough, the Kings returned to their farm near the Chikore Mission (named “Craigmore farm”) where they carried on missionary work.  Rev. King opened a store and may have been responsible for helping to establish the Craigmore post office. 

He died May 1947 at Umtali Hospital.  Mrs. King died on the their farm November 1948.  Both are buried at Mount Selinda.

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  • Mark Loomis
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John Paden Dysart

John Paden Dysart

1880-1959

John P. Dysart was born in Granville, Illinois in August 1880.  He graduated from the University of Illinois in 1906.  In 1910, he graduated from the Oberlin Theological Seminary and was ordained.  The following year, he married Bertha Fox and the couple set sail for Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) to serve as missionaries with the American Board of Commissioners at Chikore Mission.  Tragically, Mrs. Dysart died two years later in 1913 due to complications in giving birth to twins – who also did not survive.  They are buried at Mount Selinda Mission

Rev. Dysart returned to the United States in 1916.  He married second Mathilde Thorson February 1918.  Mathilde had been a missionary in Madagascar for over seven years prior.  The Dysarts embarked for Southern Rhodesia a month later where they continued their missionary work.   Along with Dr. W.T. Lawrence, Rev. Dysart was responsible for opening up the Gogoi Mission station 40 miles across the border in Portuguese East Africa (now Mozambique).  The mission farm was purchased in his name.  He also taught himself the local Shona dialect, Chindau (Ndau), and contributed to translating the Bible and other literature.  In 1915, Dysart contributed to “Chindau-English and English-Chindau Vocabulary and grammatical notes.” Over 100 years later, it remains the only Ndau dictionary.

After closure of Gogoyo, the Dysarts transferred back to Chikore Mission.  They returned to the United States in 1947.  She Died at Temple, Texas in October 1954.  He died in Temple in August 1959.

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  • Mark Loomis
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Arlen Raymond Mather

Arlen Raymond Mather

1888-1956

Arlen R. Mather was born July 1888 in Indiana.  He graduated from Franklin College in 1910 and later did postgraduate work at the University of Chicago.  He married fellow Franklin College graduate, Miss Faye Moore Smith, in 1914.

The Mathers served as missionaries in Southern Rhodesia with the American Board Mission at Mount Silinda Mission, 1917-1922.  Mr. Mather was the mission’s first Superintendent of Education and, as of 1921, the Mission treasurer.  As director of education, he was responsible for a chain of day schools built up around the mission station in the native villages (Kraals) and was Principal of the Mount Silinda School, which trained local teachers.  Mrs. Mather assisted with educational work and “work for women.”

The Mathers returned to the United States in 1922.  In 1928, they came back to Southern Rhodesia where Mr. Mather served as government inspector of mission schools until his retirement in 1948.   Mr. Mather died in West Lafayette, Indiana November 1966.  Mrs. Mather died January 1979.

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Focus Limited

Focus Limited

Gatooma

It appears that a series of postcards were produced by a company called Focus Limited in Gatooma. Research indicates that Director James Blake Dalrymple (b.1912), a Photographer, Director and specialist in educational and documentary films since 1933.

J. Blake Dalrymple emigrated to Rhodesia in 1950 where he formed Films of Africa Ltd with his brother-in-law Dick Peel for the production of documentary, training and advertising films mainly for black audiences. Around 1960, for Shell, he scripted, directed and photographed the award winning film The Captive River, the story of the building of the Kariba Dam.

Dalrymple eventually moved to Johannesburg to take over documentary producers Cineunion. They later became the Independent Film Centre. He is regarded by many as southern Africa’s greatest documentary filmmaker. He became President of the South African Society of Cinematographers and the Motion Picture Producer’s Association. He retired circa 1980.

In 1954, Dalrymple’s address is given as Wick Estate in Gatooma which correlates with the location of the postcards. He was also noted as a director for Focus Limited.

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Postcards: Focus Limited

Focus Limited

No.sDescriptionEarliest PMK Date
N/AThe Pasi Dam, Gatooma, Southern Rhodesia
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William Tilden Lawrence

William Tilden Lawrence

1875-1966

Dr. William Tilden (W. T.) Lawrence was born April 1875 in Conklin, New York.  He attended Cook Academy in Montour Falls and the New York Homeopathic Medical College (now New York Medical College), graduating in 1899.  He later attended the Royal Medical College in Edinburgh, Scotland (1907-08) and studied Tropical Medicine & Hygiene in London (1909).

Following his marriage to Florence Henderson in 1900, the Lawrence’s traveled to Africa as medical missionaries with the American Board Mission in Southern Rhodesia, where he would serve for the better part of the next 46 years.  He was in charge of the hospitals at both Mt. Selinda and Chikore Missions and the only doctor in a 500-mile radius.

Dr. Lawrence trained African outstation teachers to care for simple injuries and illnesses and trained hospital assistants and nurses.  He also helped to establish the Gogoi Mission across the border in Portuguese East Africa (now Mozambique).  His ministry has been described as “healing, teaching and preaching, on foot, on bicycle, on horseback, by motorcycle, and finally by automobile.”

Florence Lawrence was a medical missionary nurse and “midwife for most of the European babies born in Melsetter and Chipinga Districts.”  She died 1941.  Dr. Lawrence married second fellow missionary Minnie A. Tontz in 1942.  Dr. Lawrence died in 1966, and Minnie died in 1973, both in Portland, Oregon.

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  • Mark Loomis
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Netherlands Bank of Rhodesia Limited

Netherlands Bank of Rhodesia Limited

Salisbury

 

The Netherlands Bank was founded in 1888 in Amsterdam as the Nederlandsche Bank en Credietvereeniging voor Zuid-Afrika (“Dutch Bank and Credit Union for South Africa”). In the same year the bank opened an office in Pretoria, South African Republic. In 1903 the company was renamed to Nederlandsche Bank voor Zuid-Afrika (“Dutch Bank for South Africa”). In 1906, the bank expanded and an office in London was opened.

The bank split in 1951, renaming its South African part as Nederlandse Bank in Suid-Afrika Beperk/Netherlands Bank of South Africa Limited which commenced commenced banking operations. In August 1967, these operations were sold to the Netherlands Bank of Rhodesia and in 1972 the company changed its name to Rhodesia Banking Corporation Limited in 1972, then Rhobank in 1979.

Branches

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  • James Gavin
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Netherlands Bank of Rhodesia Limited: Bulawayo

Netherlands Bank of Rhodesia Limited

Bulawayo

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