The Smart Set Entertainers

The Smart Set Entertainers

The Smart Set Entertainers started in 1892. Previously known as the Light Opera Singers and The Follies, Walter George brought the Smart Set Entertainers to Australia via South Africa and America in 1912.

The 10-member troupe disbanded in 1915 when he and partner Georgie Martin joined Edward Branscombe’s Dandies.  They reformed the Smart Set in 1917, touring Australia and New Zealand through until 1920, at which time George and Martin established the Sunshine Players.

The original line-up included Emily Kroll, Edward Elliot, Sunshine James, Mona Thomas, Tristram Greene and Edgar Holland (piano).

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John Mitchell Watt

John Mitchell Watt

1892-1980

 

Prof John Mitchell Watt was a 20th-century South African physician and pharmacologist. He served in both World Wars and made extensive catalogues of traditional African medicines.

He was born in Port Elizabeth in South Africa on 1 December 1892 and was educated at the Grey Institute High School in Port Elizabeth. His family moved to Scotland and he completed his education at Stirling High School. He studied Medicine at Edinburgh University graduating in 1916. He then joined the Royal Army Medical Corps.

In 1921 he became Professor of Pharmacology at University College, Johannesburg. In 1933 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. In the Second World War he was in charge of medical supplies for the South African Defence Headquarters for the entire war. In 1957 he joined the South African Institute for Medical Research.

In 1965 he moved back to Britain to teach at the Plymouth College of Technology before moving into semi-retirement in 1965, also locating to Australia where he was a part-time Demonstrator in Physiology at the University of Queensland.

In 1972 the Rand Afrikaans University awarded him an honorary doctorate (LLD) for his academic writing

He died in Brisbane on 23 April 1980.

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Joseph Lazarus

Joseph Lazarus

 

Joseph Lazarus first arrived in Barberton, South Africa during the gold boom from Britain and established J & M Lazarus, with his brother Marucie, in Lourenço Marques, Portuguese East Africa in 1899. Their last advertisement appears in 1907, although their box number is still listed in the 1909 edition. They sold their studio to Sidney Hocking.

Joseph appears to have settled in Bulawayo, Rhodesia. A number of philatelic covers exist bearing his name.

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Dale Evans

Dale Evans

Dale Evans was born Lucille Wood Smith on October 31, 1912 in Uvalde, Texas. She had a tumultuous early life. Her name was changed to Frances Octavia Smith while she was still an infant and spent a lot of time living with her uncle. At age 14, she eloped with and married Thomas F. Fox, with whom she had one son, Thomas F. Fox, Jr., when she was 15.

A year later, abandoned by her husband, she found herself in Memphis, Tennessee, a single parent, pursuing a career in music. She landed a job with local radio stations (WMC and WREC), singing and playing piano. Divorced in 1929, she took the name Dale Evans in the early 1930’s to promote her singing career.

After beginning her career singing at the radio station where she was employed as a secretary, Evans had a productive career as a jazz, swing, and big band singer that led to a screen test and contract with 20th Century Fox studios. During her time at 20th Century Fox, the studio promoted her as the unmarried supporter of her teenage “brother” Tommy (actually her son Tom Fox, Jr.). This deception continued through her divorce from Butts in 1946 and her development as a cowgirl co-star to Roy Rogers at Republic Studios.

Evans married Roy Rogers on New Year’s Eve 1947 at the Flying L Ranch where they had earlier filmed the movie Home in Oklahoma. The marriage was Rogers’ third and Evans’ fourth but was successful; the two were a team on- and off-screen from 1946 until Rogers’ death in 1998.

Shortly after the wedding, Evans ended the deception regarding her son, Tommy. Roy had an adopted child, Cheryl, and two biological children, Linda and Roy (Dusty) Jr., from his second marriage. Together they had one child, Robin Elizabeth, who died of complications of Down syndrome. Evans and Rogers adopted four other children: Mimi, Dodie, Sandy, and Debbie.

Evans was very influential in changing public perceptions of children with developmental disabilities and served as a role model for many parents after she wrote Angel Unaware. Evans went on to write a number of religious and inspirational books. Roy and Dale appeared many times with Billy Graham in Crusades all over the country, singing gospel songs and giving their testimony.

From 1951-57, Evans and Rogers starred in the highly successful television series The Roy Rogers Show. In late 1962, the couple co-hosted a comedy-western-variety program, The Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Show, which was cancelled after three months.

In the 1970s, Evans recorded several solo albums of religious music. During the 1980s, the couple introduced their films weekly on the former The Nashville Network. In the 1990s, Evans hosted her own religious television program.

Evans died of congestive heart failure on February 7, 2001 in Apple Valley, California.

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John Simco Warren

John Simco Warren

1869-1929

John Simco Warren was born in England in 1869. He was a chemist who worked in Bulawayo. In 1907, he married Frances ‘Fanny’ Garrod.

Garrod had arrived with her first first husband, John Knox, from Port Elizabeth by ox wagon. She was a qualified nurse and was in the Bulawayo laager during the ’96 rebellion. In 1907, many years after the death of Mr Knox, she married Warren.

He died of heart failure on 27th March, 1929.

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Albert Spear Hitchcock

Albert Spear Hitchcock

1865-1935

Albert Spear Hitchcock (b.September 4, 1865) was an American botanist and agrostologist.

Hitchcock graduated from the Iowa Agricultural College with bachelor’s degree in 1884 and M.S. in 1886. From 1892 to 1901 he was a professor of botany at the Kansas Agricultural College. Hitchcock joined the United States Department of Agriculture in 1901 as Assistant Agrostologist under Frank Lamson-Scribner. In 1905 he was put in charge of the grass herbarium and became Systematic Agrostologist.

In 1912 he became Custodian of Grasses, Division of Plants, United States National Museum. Hitchcock remained Custodian without remuneration until his death. His field notebooks are archived in the Smithsonian Institution. He was a professor of botany in the Kansas State Agricultural College and authored over 250 works during his lifetime.

After 1928, he held the title of Principal Biologist in charge of Systematic Agrostology of the Department of Agriculture. He died on 16th December, 1935 on board the liner City of Norfolk, in which he was returning to the United States after visiting various European herbaria and attending the International Botanical Congress at Amsterdam.

Contributors
  • James Gavin

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Sir Leopold Frank Moore

Sir Leopold Frank Moore

1868-1945

Sir Leopold Frank Moore was born in London, England in 1868. He was a chemist and newspaper proprietor, and later a member of the Northern Rhodesia Legislative Council. He married Katherine Maud Moore in Mafeking, South Africa. Originally based on the Northern Bank of the Zambezi at the Old Drift, he would later resettle at Livingstone.

In 1898, L F Moore (first chairman) helped form the Pharmaceutical Society of Rhodesia in Bulawayo with six founder members namely Mr. H. W. Smart, Mr. W. D. Copley (first Secretary), Mr. C. F. Conrath, Mr. C. Cattel and Mr. Scott. Moore soon became ‘President’.

Mr. L. F. Moore, after a brief experience of journalism in Bulawayo, took a mimeograph, stencil and paper to Livingstone on 31st March, 1906, and started the Livingstone Mail. At first a Roneo was used, but in 1908, Mr. Moore imported a “cropper” and continued to use that machine, which involved hand-setting and re-distributing type after printing, until 1911, when he set up the Typograph.

Moore was outspoken critic against the British South Africa Company in North Western Rhodesia and was a major supporter of establishing Livingstone as the centre of North Western Rhodesia. His criticisms highlighted the poor transport links between Livingstone and the Falls as a significant handicap to tourism.

By August 1906 rumours were in circulation concerning the ongoing campaign by the residents, led by Moore and the Livingstone Mail, to relocate Livingstone to a site closer to the Falls. It was believed that the Administration had requested £60,000 in order to move both the capital at Kalomo and the town of Livingstone to a new site in the vicinity of the Bridge Engineers Camp. A front-page headline from the Livingstone Mail in June 1907 claiming that the move had been approved turned out to be wishful thinking.

He died 15th May, 1945 in Livingstone due to cancer.

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References

Contributor
  • Keith Harrop

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John Thomas Gosling

John Thomas Gosling

 

John Thomas Gosling became acting Postmaster General of British Central Africa on 29th July, 1897, succeeding Edward Alston on 28th September, 1898. He received his training from the Imperial Post Office.

Gosling was a specialist Postal Officer and helped speed up internal mails, partly by a system of nightly postal runners. By 1899, over 300 mail bags a month were being carried by the postal runners, covering 10,000 miles a month (with 3,000 miles conducted at night).

He also introduced a number of new postal services, opened up new post offices and introduced the first annual postal guide. In 1897 stocks of 1d stamps were near exhausted. Three shilling stamps were overprinted to assist. However, in 1898 Gosling designed and printed his own stamps known as ‘cheque stamps’.

He remained in office until 9th April, 1904 at which time he was transferred to East Africa and Uganda Protectorate.

References

  • The Society of Malawi Journal Vol. 24, No. 2 (July, 1971)
  • The Society of Malawi Journal Vol. 29, No. 2 (July, 1976)
  • East Africa (British) Its History, People, Commerce, Industries and Resources.
Contributors
  • Peter Gorton

Betty (Mason) Wolfe

Betty (Mason) Wolfe

 

Betty Mason grew up in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  She attended Biola University, an evangelical Christian university outside Los Angeles, California and then studied nursing at Lutheran Hospital of Indiana.

Beginning 1951, Mason served as a nurse with The Evangelical Alliance Mission (TEAM) at the Msengedzi Mission in Southern Rhodesia.  While there, she met South African John Wolfe. They were married December 11, 1954. They would go on to serve together in Southern Rhodesia/Rhodesia for the next 25 years.

References

  • Ordinary People in God’s Hands – Diane Powell Hawkins
Contributors
  • Mark Loomis

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Wilfrid John Leslie

Wilfrid John Leslie

1890-1952

Wilfrid John Leslie was born in Arbroath, Angus, Scotland in 1890. He was educated at Watson’s College, Edinburgh, as a chartered accountant. Prior to World War I, he went to the oil fields of Mexico. At the outbreak of war, he joined the Black Watch as one of Kitchener’s First Hundred Thousand and found in France in June, 1915 where, in September, he was severely wounded.After the war, he went to Nyasaland with The Imperial Tobacco Company.

A few later, he left the business to start as an auditor. He then founded Naperi Farm where he started with dairy and pigs and later expanded into a butchery and bakery. He was a pioneer in the ghee industry and in the export of dried fish from Lake Nyasa.

He was also a keen member of the Nyasaland Chamber of Commerce, and served for many years as a member of the Blantyre Town Council. During World War II he was second in command of the Blantyre Platoon of the Nyasaland Deference Force.

Leslie was an active man with a keen interest in sport. In 1948 he established The Leslie Sevens – an annual seven-a-side rugby tournament held at Blantyre Sports Club. He married in 1951. He was also a member of the Rotary Club of Blantyre.

He died 23rd April, 1952.

References

Contributors
  • James Gavin

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