Mathilde Thorson Dysart

Mathilde Thorson Dysart

1882-1954

 

The second wife of John Paden Dysart, Mathilde Thorton was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota December 21, 1882.  She was the daughter of Nelr Thorson and Christina Larson.  She attended the Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess Institute (The Lutheran Deaconess Home and Hospital) and then served as a missionary in Madagascar for over seven years.

In February 1918, she married fellow missionary John P. Dysart.  The Dysarts would go on to serve with the American Board Mission at the Gogoi Mission in Portuguese East Africa and, upon its closing, at Chikore Mission in Southern Rhodesia until 1947.  She died in Temple, Texas October 1954.

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  • Mark Loomis

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Helen Newton Springer

Helen Newton Springer

1893 – 1990

 

The daughter of a Methodist minister, Helen N. Everett was born in Charlton, Massachusetts October 17, 1893. She graduated from Mt. Holyoke College in 1917 followed by nurses training at Massachusetts General Hospital. In 1921, she joined her brother, Rev. Edward I. Everett, as a missionary with the Methodist Congo Mission Conference in Africa.  She began work as a nurse in Kapanga and also served in Kanene and Elisabethville, Congo.

She also served as a missionary teacher at the American Board Mission‘s Mt. Silinda Mission in Southern Rhodesia in 1935 and with the Methodist Mutambara Mission in Southern Rhodesia as a teacher beginning 1936. 

Everett retired in 1942, returning to the United States. In 1956, following the death of his first wife, Helen Emily (Chapman) Springer, Everett married Bishop John M. Springer, the former Methodist Bishop for Africa. Helen (Everett) Springer died 1990.

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  • Mark Loomis
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Alan Drysdall

Alan Drysdall

1934-2017

Alan Drysdall graduated, in 1954, with a first class honours degree in geology from Southampton University and after appropriate research, with a PhD in 1957. In August 1957, he took up a post with the Geological Survey of Northern Rhodesia, where he lived until 1975.

Alan had a distinguished career in Northern Rhodesia, latterly from about 1970 as director of the Zambian Geological Survey, which included having named after him (in 1961) a new genera of scalenodont, a mammal like reptile, Luangwa drysdalli (featured on a stamp released on 1st February 1973) and also, in 1973, having a new mineral species drysdallite named after him. After working on projects in Pakistan and Canada in November 1977 Alan accepted a post in Saudi Arabia, eventually retiring from there in 1990.

While in Lusaka Alan took up philately again and joined the Lusaka Philatelic Society and in 1971 the RSC and in 1974 the Royal Philatelic Society London. In 1976, his first book was published: The Stamps and Postal History of Northern Rhodesia and Zambia 1963-65, followed, in 1986: by The Nyasaland-Rhodesia Field Force 1914-18 (jointly with Kenneth Pennycuick), in 1988, by The Oates Correspondence; a Postal History of Frank Oates’ Travels in Matabeleland and Zambesia 1873-75 (jointly with Kenneth Wright) and, in 1990, Mashonaland; a Postal History 1890-96 (jointly with Dave Collis).

Since these early days Alan wrote prolifically for The Transvaal Philatelist, The Natal and Zululand Post (both of which he edited for many years), the London Philatelist, the Rhodesian Study Circle Journal and the RSC Handbook Memoir series, the South African Philatelist and Gibbons Stamp Monthly and others, and also written a number of books on Transvaal stamps. Indeed, the early Transvaal stamps were Alan’s main collecting interest, his collection winning many gold medals at National and International level before it was sold in 2006.

Alan’s preeminence in the world of philately was recognised by many honours, culminating in his signing of the Rolls of Honour in South Africa in 1995 and in England in 2003.

Alan Drysdall, President of the RSC 2011-14 and a Life Vice President, died on 11 January 2017.

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Frank T. Meacham

Frank T. Meacham

(1890-1960)

 

Rev. Meacham was born in Clay, Iowa in March 1890.  He attended Grinnell College, Iowa, graduating 1913, followed by studies at the Chicago Theological Seminary.  He graduated 1917, was ordained, and married first Helen Jane Cowden August 1917.  She died November 1918.  He married second Doris Van der Pyl January 1920 at Oberlin, Ohio. She graduated from Wellesley College 1915.

Rev. Meacham received an appointment with the American Board Mission in March 1920 and the couple sailed for Southern Rhodesia. Rev. Meacham served initially as pastor of the Chikore Mission church and responsible for “evangelistic work in the out stations.”

They were later at Mt. Silinda Mission and, as of 1940, he was in charge of the Mt. Silinda Institute.  After retiring, the Meachams continued to live in Southern Rhodesia.  Rev. Meacham died in Umtali (Mutare) Southern Rhodesia January 1960.  He is buried at Mt. Silinda Mission.

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Stationery: American Board Mission – Wm. T. Lawrence M.D. – East Africa Mission

American Board Mission

Wm. T. Lawrence M.D. – East Africa Mission

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Stationery: American Board Mission – Arthur J. Orner – Chikore Via Mount Silinda

American Board Mission

Arthur J. Orner – Chikore Via Mount Silinda

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Stationery: American Board Mission – Arthur J. Orner – Chikore P. O. Chikore

American Board Mission

Arthur J. Orner – Chikore P. O. Chikore

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Solomon Samuel Grossberg

Solomon Samuel Grossberg

1890-1964

Solomon Samuel Grossberg was born in 1890. His place of birth is listed as a number of places including Latvia, Lithuania and Russia. He was the younger son of Abraham Grossberg of Plumtree and he was a prominent Jewish member in the Rhodesian community.

Solomon was a financier and businessman who ran a successful wholesale business in Bulawayo, S. S. Grossberg. During WWI he was part of the Jewish Rhodesian Reserves. On 13th June, 1946 he made the King’s Birthday Honours for services in connection with benevolent and social welfare movements.

Solomon died of heart related issues on 4th July, 1964.

References

  • An African Trading Empire: The Story of the Susman Brothers and Wulfsohn 1901-2005 – Hugh Macmillan
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Louise Fleming Torrence

Louise Fleming Torrence

1901 – 1995

Missionary teacher Torrence was born in Laurel, Montana to James S. and Harriet (Fleming) Torrence. She was “appointed” a missionary in 1927 and as of 1929 was at Mount Silinda Mission in Southern Rhodesia with the American Board Mission.  By 1935, she was Principal of the Boarding School and Central Day School at Chikore Mission.

In 1957, she was in charge of the teachers training department at Mount Silinda. Following her return from furlough in 1961, Torrence was back at Chikore where she recruited, trained and supervised Sunday school teachers at the mission and surrounding villages (“outstations”). She remained at Chikore until at least 1962.

Torrence died February 1995 in Los Angeles, California.

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  • Mark Loomis
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Madeline Ester Dixon

Madeline Ester Dixon

1897 – 1972

Madeline Dixon was born October 1897 in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, daughter of George E. and Carrie D. (Tiantha) Halford. She taught violin for a year at the Berkshire Music School in Pittsfield following graduation from Middlebury College in 1919.

In August 1920, she married Reverend Frederick R Dixon. That November, they set sail to Africa to serve as missionaries with the American Board at Mount Silinda Mission in Southern Rhodesia. Mrs. Dixon assisted her husband at the Mount Silinda Bible School teaching English, reading and the Bible to the wives of African “evangelists.” Between 1930 and 1933 the Dixons were at Chikore Mission

All three of the Dixon’s children were born while in Southern Rhodesia. The Dixons returned home October 1933, living in the New England area.  Mrs. Dixon died January 1972 at age 74 and is buried in Henniker, New Hampshire.

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  • Mark Loomis
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