Seventh-Day Adventist Church: Southern Rhodesia Mission Field

Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Southern Rhodesia Mission Field

 

The Southern Rhodesia Mission Field was organised in 1921. The territory covered the native work of Southern Rhodesia.

 

Mission

Native Mission

  • 1894 – Solusi Mission Station
  • 1910 – Hanke Mission Station
  • 1910 – Fort Victoria Mission Station
  • 1929 – Bulawayo Location Mission Station
  • 1929 – Filabusi Mission Station
  • 1929 – Headlands Mission
  • 1929 – Gwaai Mission Station (formerly Tjolotjo Mission Station)
  • Lower Shangani Mission Station
  • 1936 – Nata Mission Station

Seventh-Day Adventist Church: South-East African Union Mission Field

Seventh-Day Adventist Church

South-East African Union Mission Field

The South-East African Union Mission Field was organised in 1925. The territory covered the Nyasaland, Portuguese East Africa north of latitude 22, and North-East Rhodesia east of meridian 22.

Missions

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Seventh-Day Adventist Church: Northern Rhodesia Mission Field

Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Northern Rhodesia Mission Field

The Northern Rhodesian Mission Field was organised in 1921. The territory covered Northern Rhodesia and the Caprivi Strip (a salient of Namibia that protrudes eastward for about 450 km from the north-eastern corner of Namibia. It is bordered by Botswana to the south, and by Angola and Zambia to the north).

Missions

  • 1905 – Rusangu Mission Station
  • 1917 – Musofu Mission Station
  • 1921 – Katima Mulilo Mission Station
  • 1925 – Muchenje Mission (re-opened 1934)
  • 1928 – Liumba Hill Mission Station

Native Missions

  • 1930 – Demu Mission
  • 1930 – Munenga Mission
  • 1931 – Sala Mission Station
  • 1933 – Sitote Misison Station
  • 1934 – Kuamba Mission
  • 1935 – Dimbwe Mission
  • 1935 – Kazungula Mission
  • 1936 – Tapo Mission Station

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Seventh-Day Adventist Church: Sitote Mission Station

Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Sitote Mission Station

Sitote Mission Station was a native mission established in 1933. It’s director was Robert Njekwa and it managed three native schools.

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Seventh-Day Adventist Church: Liumba Hill Mission Station

Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Liumba Hill Mission Station

Samuel M Konigmacher established a school at Liumba Hill, Barotseland in 1928. Konigmacher had worked at Rusangu Mission and left to open Musofu Mission Station before opening Liumba Hill.

In 1935, a small dispensary was added and Konigmacher oversaw seven village schools.

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Seventh-Day Adventist Church: Mwami Mission Station

Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Mwami Mission Station

The Mwami Mission Station was purchased by the Seventh-Day Adventists in 1925. Located 30km southeast of Chipata in the Eastern Province of Zambia and just 8km west of the Malawi-Zambia border, the mission was created to serve the people across that region. In 1927, a hospital with established at the station.

In 1962, the Mwami School of Nursing was established. It continues to operate today, training both young men and women to serve as qualified Zambian Enrolled Nurses across the country. An eye surgery centre at the mission saw its first patients in 1985, a service that is still provided to the community.

Facilities

References

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Seventh-Day Adventist Church: Mwami Mission Station – Mwami Hospital

Mwami Mission Station

Mwami Hospital

In 1927, Dr E G Marcus established a rudimentary hospital at Mwami Mission Station. When Dr Marcus arrived, there was no infrastructure and many of the native Zambians wanted little to do with mission considering it ‘white man’s magic’. Attitudes changed when a small boy who was severely burnt was brought to the hospital and recovered. After this, attitudes towards the hospital started to change.

Initially, the hospital included a special treatment centre for those suffering from leprosy. After the first three patients arrived, another fifty arrived nearly 3 month later. Services included removing teeth and within six months of operation, Dr Marcus removed the first cataract.

Money was provided by The British Empire Leprosy Relief Association to erect buildings and huts, with some money also being used to equip the dispensary and ward. Mrs Jewell acted as a nurse.

The hospital continues today.

References

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Frances Persons (nee Jessop)

Frances Persons (nee Jessop)

1913-2004

Frances “Lois” Jessop was born in Chadwell, England March 1913.  She came to the United States in 1929. After graduating from the Chicago Evangelistic Institute she enrolled at Asbury College, but interrupted her studies to service as a missionary with the Methodist Episcopal Church’s Old Umtali Mission in Southern Rhodesia beginning 1937. There she taught in the Bible Institute, edited a journal for the mission and assisted the mission director. After three years she returned to Asbury to finish her degree.

In 1941, she married Maurice E. Persons whom she had met as a fellow student at Chicago Evangelistic Institute and who had also been in Southern Rhodesia.  A year later, the Persons returned to Africa as Methodist missionaries where Mr. Persons served in a number of capacities between 1947 and 1968 in Liberia and the Congo.

Mrs. Person served as a high school teacher, conducted classes for the development of African women and taught Swahili to new missionaries.  They return returned to the Congo in 1977 where they served until retirement in Phoenix, Arizona in 1980. Mrs. Person died June 2003.  Mr. Persons died 2004.

Reference

Contributors
  • Mark Loomis

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