The Navy League

The Navy League

Salisbury

 

The Navy League was established in 1894 in Great Britain. The League was established in New Zealand (Auckland) 20 January 1896 and later at Wellington 14 March 1904, and in Australia November 1900.

The United States of America adopted the US Navy League Sea Cadets in 1902. Other countries with branches of the Navy League were in South Africa, India, Canada, Hong Kong from the early 1900’s. Southern Rhodesia also had a branch.

In Rhodesia, the Navy League sponsored the Southern Rhodesia Sea Cadets Corps consisting of boys aged 13 to 21. The corps had branches in Salisbury and Bulawayo. In 1945, more than 350 Rhodesians were serving at sea in ships of the Royal Navy and South African Naval Forces with many of them trained in the cadets at Salisbury.

Cinderellas

References

  • Southern Rhodesia, Past and Present (1945)
Contributors
  • Geoff Brakspear

Cinderellas: Navy League – Rhodesia Buys British

Navy League

Rhodesia Buys British

Details

  • Date of Issue: c.1940
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Commercial Covers

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Cinderellas: British Navy – We Realise In Rhodesia

World War II

We Realise In Rhodesia

This label was also produced for Australia and Egypt.

Details

  • Date of Issue: c.1940
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  • Perf: Roulette
  • Sheet: 5 x 4
  • Booklet: 10 sheets per booklet
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Commercial Covers

FB

Cinderellas: National War Fund of Southern Rhodesia – Type I

National War Fund of Southern Rhodesia

Type I – You Can’t Give Too Much

Details

  • Date of Issue: 1941
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Commercial Covers

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National War Fund of Southern Rhodesia: Air Raid Distress Fund

National War Fund of Southern Rhodesia

Air Raid Distress Fund

Between 1940-41 money poured into the Air Raid Distress Fund. In 1941, £60,000 was sent to Britain with some of the money earmarked to for the purchase of sixteen canteens for various cities. By February, 1942, £82,000 had been sent.

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Military: Zambia Regiment – 1st Battalion Zambia Regiment

Military

Zambia Regiment – 1st Battalion Zambia Regiment

When Northern Rhodesia achieved independence in 1964, the Northern Rhodesia 1st Battalion Regiment became the 1st Battalion Zambia Regiment. The flash remained the same as it was during the Federation period except for the addition of the word ‘Zambia.’

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World War 2: AFRAF

World War 2

AFRAF

AFRAF was Rhodesia’s first services newspaper. It was conceived aboard a ship returning from Europe during World War II. The newspaper, produced at camp Heaney, was produced for the whole command at Heaney.

The first edition was released on 7th August, 1941 and priced at 3p. The editors, John K. Tither and Alan Brian Chalkley, both had journalistic experience. Within a week of release, the newspaper reached a peak of 2,300 copies.

References

  • A Pride of Eagles: A History of the Rhodesian Air Force –  Beryl Salt
Contributors
  • Walter Herdzik

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Commonwealth Ceasefire Monitoring Force

Commonwealth Ceasefire Monitoring Force

In December 1979, the Commonwealth Ceasefire Monitoring Force (CMF) was established by the Commonwealth to supervise the implementation of the Lancaster House Agreement between the government of Southern Rhodesia and the guerilla forces of the Patriotic Front.

Under the agreement UK authority was restored over its rebellious colony and a ceasefire implemented. A general election followed and independence was achieved by the new Republic of Zimbabwe. The role of the multi-national force was to keep the peace between 22,000 guerrillas and the Rhodesian forces during the cease-fire run-up to the 1980 elections.

The CMF was tasked with monitoring the agreement and resembled a UN observer mission except that its duties were more extensive, it enjoyed municipal backing.

References

Contributors
  • Tony van Rensburg

Assembly Point: Juliet

Assembly Point

Juliet

The Zezani Mission was Assembly Point Juliet during the Bush War.

On 6th January, 1978 the mission was attacked by the Zimbabwe African National Liberation Army (ZANLA). Pastor A.B.C Siwela reported the army stole telephones, cut wires and smashed windows of the clinic, stealing medical supplies. The mission was eventually ordered to close as it was frequently visited by the European-led army from a nearby camp and the safety of the mission workers could be guaranteed.

Bush War: Assembly Points

Bush War

Assembly Points

 

During the Lancaster House Conference, one of the agreements was to create assembly points throughout Rhodesia to house guerillas and initiate a demobilising exercise. The Assembly Points were the concentration points for all guerilla groups. Each was to be manned by a small contingent of Commonwealth monitoring forces.

All the Zimbabwean National Liberation Army (ZANLA) and Zimbabwe People’s Revolutionary Army (ZIPRA) guerillas were to go to the closest assembly point. Between 28th December, 1979 and 4th January, 1980 more than 25 000 patriotic forces marched into the 16 assembly points.

At the same time, Rhodesian soldiers began to concentrate at 40 different bases spread all over the country. The Rhodesian troop locations were mainly in the centre of the country, but with some right on the borders. Thus the guerillas in their assembly points would be sandwiched between Rhodesian forces and cut off from their escape route to Mozambique or Zambia if attacked.

Once in the assembly points, all guerillas were required to register their names, weapons and the weapons serial numbers. Within assembly points were daily counts of the Patriotic Front forces.

Assembly Points

  • Alpha
  • Bravo
  • Charlie
  • Delta
  • Echo
  • Foxtrot
  • Golf
  • Hotel
  • Juliet
  • Kilo
  • Lima
  • Mike
  • November
  • Papa
  • Quebec
  • Romeo

References

Contributors
  • James Gavin
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