Royal Rhodesia Regiment: Training Depot

Royal Rhodesia Regiment

Training Depot

The Training Depot of the Royal Rhodesia Regiment was opened in October 1955, at Llewellin Barracks, Heany. Here, trainees under went four and a half months of continuous training under regular instructors of the Federal Army. On completion of this period, trainees were posted to the Territorial Force Units to complete their Peace Training Liability.

References

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Royal Rhodesia Regiment: 2 Independent Company

Royal Rhodesia Regiment

2 Independent Company

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Royal Rhodesia Regiment

Royal Rhodesia Regiment

The Rhodesia Regiment (RR) was one of the oldest and largest regiments in the Rhodesian Army. It served on the side of the United Kingdom in the Second Boer War and the First and Second World Wars and served the Republic of Rhodesia in the Rhodesian Bush War.

During the First World War, an affiliation was formed between the King’s Royal Rifle Corps (KRRC) and the Rhodesia Regiment, with a platoon of Rhodesians serving in the 2 KRRC. In addition to the similar cap badge with a red backing, the affiliation with the KRRC led to many similarities in uniform as a rifle regiment with private soldiers holding the title of “Rifleman”.

In 1947, as a result of its service in World War II the regiment was granted the title of Royal Rhodesia Regiment by King George VI, who became the regiment’s first Colonel-in-Chief.

Following the Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) in 1965, the Royal Rhodesia Regiment (RRR) consisted of a number of territorial army battalions (1RR, 2RR, 4RR, 5RR, 6RR, 8RR, 9RR, 10RR) and 6 national service independent companies (1 Indep Coy RR, 2 Indep Coy RR, 3 Indep Coy RR, 4 Indep Coy RR, 5 Indep Coy RR and 6 Indep Coy, RR) as well as a training depot, DRR, which received and trained most of the Rhodesian Army national servicemen from the 1950s onwards. 3RR and 7RR were Northern Rhodesian (Zambia) battalions that became part of the Zambian military. After national service they were posted to a territorial battalion in or close to the town or city they hailed from.

When Rhodesia became a republic in 1970, the regiment’s title reverted to Rhodesia Regiment with Queen Elizabeth II resigning her position as Colonel-in-Chief.

Facilities

Independent Company

  • 1 IND Company
  • 2 IND Company
  • 3 IND Company
  • 4 IND Company
  • 5 IND Company
  • 6 IND Company

World War 2: Civil Censorship – Southern Rhodesia (DE/24)

Civil Censorship

Southern Rhodesia (DE/24)

No.ColourEarliest DateLatest DateOffice
DE/24Purple01 SEPT 4501 SEPT 45Bulawayo

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Bush War: Guard Force

Bush War

Guard Force

The Guard Force was the fourth arm of the Rhodesian Security Forces. It consisted of both black and white troops whose initial role was to provide protection for villagers in the Protected Village system. Its headquarters were in North Avenue, Salisbury. Its training establishment was based at Chikurubi in Salisbury.

During the latter stages of the Bush War they provided a role in the protection of white-owned farmland, tribal purchase lands and other strategic locations. They also raised two infantry Battalions and provided troops in every facet of the war in each of the Operational Areas. It was a large component of the Security Forces, with a strength of over 7,200 personnel.

The guard force cap badge was a castle on top of a dagger, below the castle was a scroll reading ‘Guard Force’

Protected Villages

References

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Bush War: Guard Force – 2GP Chipinga

Guard Force

2GP Chipinga

Internment Camps: Southern Rhodesia – Rusape Polish Refugee Settlement

Southern Rhodesia

Rusape Polish Refugee Settlement

The British Financial Secretary of State advised the Governor of Southern Rhodesia on 11 May 1942 that between 1933 and 1939, Britain had received 55,000 German and Austrian refugees. Further, since May 1940, 63,000 refugees from the Continent and an additional 47 000 British refugees from the Channel Islands and Gibraltar had also been received.

As a result, Britain’s capacity to absorb refugees had been overwhelmed and the country was therefore seeking alternative locations as a matter of urgency. More territories under the British Empire on the African continent were expected to alleviate pressure on Britain by participating in the new scheme.

Following this communication, Southern Rhodesia received the first batch of 1,000 Polish refugees in January 1943, 500 of whom were accommodated in Marrandellas and Diggleford and another 500 in Rusapi (now Rusape). The camps established were expected to house about 500 refugees each but, by November 1944, a total of 6,831 refugees were in the colony.

Markings

Covers

Contributors
  • Keith Harrop

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Internment Camps: Southern Rhodesia – Hartley Temporary Camp

Southern Rhodesia

Hartley Temporary Camp

 

The declaration of war against Germany on 3 September 1939 by Britain triggered off the internment process, as the former was accompanied by a proclamation, whose message was repeated in the colonies newspapers: Warning all enemy subjects within the colonies to register details of their birth, passport and property owned, surrender all arms, ammunition and yourself to the Member-in-Charge of the nearest police station.

Following this announcement, internment on the African continent proceeded apace. In Tanganyika, 4 000 Germans in the Iringa region, were quickly rounded up and dispatched to the Union of South Africa. Their women and children were destined for Southern Rhodesia.

On the night of 3-4 September, the Department of Ministry of Justice and Defence,
through the Police Criminal Investigations Department (CID) and army, moved swiftly on all ‘Starred Germans’, capturing 508 who were then gathered at Chikurubi Prison. After a few days interrogation, many were released on parole leaving 52 men and a woman under restriction. These were moved to a temporary holding camp and former primary school in Hartley, 100 kilometres west of the Salisbury, where they were joined by 64 aliens from
Northern Rhodesia.

At this time, the first selected site in Salisbury, east of KG VI Barracks, was still under construction. It became ready on 12 October, when it was opened as Internment Camp No. 1 (General).

Markings

Covers

Contributors
  • Keith Harrop

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