National Milling Company Ltd

National Milling Company Ltd

Lusaka

 

After Zambia gained its independence on 24th October, 1964 the government of the Republic of Zambia nationalised most industries which then saw National Milling Company Limited operating as a government parastatal under the Industrial Development Corporation of Zambia Ltd (INDECO) group of companies.  This was a body formed by the government to oversee the operations of all companies that were nationalised.

The coming of multi party politics in 1991 saw the privatisation of most state owned enterprises and during this period National Milling Company Limited was privatised and purchased by Namib Mills. The new owners faced a lot of challenges and were eventually forced to close the company.

In 1998, Seaboards and Overseas Trading group purchased National Milling Corporation.

Contributors
  • James Gavin

FB

Round Table Malawi

Round Table Malawi

Blantyre

The Blantyre-Limbe Round Table No.20 was established in 1960.Round Table is a non-political, non-sectarian association of young men between the ages of 18 and 40, embracing representatives of nearly every profession and occupation.

Its objects are the encouragement of high ethical standards, the promotion of social communication and fellowship among young professional and business men, the stimulation of individual interest in everything affecting the public welfare, and the promotion of understanding amongst peoples of different cultural, linguistic, religious and political backgrounds. ​

References

Contributors
  • James Gavin

FB

North Eastern Rhodesia: 1902 Game Regulations – Schedule III

North Eastern Rhodesia

1902 Game Regulations – Schedule III

 

Game listed under Schedule III required a General Licence. The General Licence cost £2 and allowed the capture, hunting or killing of the following animals:

  • Hippopotamus
  • Wart-Hog
  • Bush Pig
  • Ibex
  • Chevrotains
  • Sable Antelope
  • Roan Antelope
  • Koodoo
  • Buffalo
  • Pookoo
  • Lechwe
  • Inyala

It also included any antelope not listed in Schedule I or Schedule II.

North Eastern Rhodesia: 1902 Game Regulations – Schedule II

North Eastern Rhodesia

1902 Game Regulations – Schedule II

A Special Licence was required to hunt animals named under Schedule II and also covered any animals under a General Licence. In addition, the licence included the 10/- Gun Licence.

The Special Licence cost £25 and allowed the capture, hunting or killing of the following animals:

  • Elephant
  • Rhinoceros
  • Wildebeeste
  • Zebra (except Mountain Zebra)
  • Eland
  • Gnu (except White Tailed Gnu).

FB

North Eastern Rhodesia: 1902 Game Regulations – Schedule I

North Eastern Rhodesia

1902 Game Regulations – Schedule I

 

Under Schedule I, hunters had to obtain an Administrator’s Licence. This licence was only granted in limited and special circumstances. It also allowed hunting in the Mweru and Luangwa Reserves (where it was generally unlawful to hunt).

The Administrator’s Licence cost £5 and allowed the capture, hunting or killing of the following animals:

  • On account of their usefulness:
    • Vultures
    • Owls
    • Secretary Birds
    • Rhinoceros Birds or Beefeaters.
  • On account of their rarity and threatened extermination:
    • Giraffe
    • Gorilla
    • Chimpanzee
    • Wild asses
    • White-tailed gnu
    • Little Liberian Hippopotamus
    • Mountain Zebra.

United Nations: Permanent Missions

United Nations

Permanent Missions

A permanent representative is the head of a diplomatic mission to the United Nations. Of these, the most high-profile UN permanent representatives are those assigned to headquarters in New York City. However, member states also appoint permanent representatives to the other UN offices in Geneva, Vienna, and Nairobi.

Many countries call their UN permanent representative UN ambassadors. Although a permanent representative holds the equivalent diplomatic rank of an ambassador (or chief of mission or high commissioner), he or she is accredited to an international organisation, and not to a head of state (as a nation’s ambassador would be) or to a head of government (as a high commissioner would be).

Contributors
  • James Gavin

FB

National Assembly of Zambia: Office of the Clerk

National Assembly of Zambia

Office of the Clerk

The office of the Clerk of the National Assembly is enshrined in the Constitution of the Republic of Zambia. Article 73 states that “There shall be a Clerk of the National Assembly and such other offices in the department of the Clerk of the National Assembly as may be prescribed by an Act of Parliament.”

The Clerk is the Chief Advisor to the House, the Hon. Mr Speaker, the Deputy Speaker and the Deputy Chairman of Committees. During the sittings, the service of the House itself is maintained by the Clerk and her assistants who sit at the Table of the House. They keep the minutes of proceedings, which are subsequently published as the votes and proceedings. The Clerk is the custodian of all records and documents. She prepares the order or notice paper and any other paper issued in connection with the business of the House.

References

Contributors
  • James Gavin

Republic of Zambia

Republic of Zambia

In the mid-1950’s, Kenneth Kaunda founded the Zambia African National Congress (ZANC), a breakaway from the more conservative African National Congress (ANC), to fight for civil and voting rights for the African population.

ZANC was quickly banned by the colonial authorities, and Kaunda arrested. During his internment, his followers evaded the ban by remoulding the ZANC as the United National Independence Party (UNIP), taking the name from the main platform of its programme.

Kaunda became chairman of the UNIP on his release in 1960. In turn, the UNIP was outlawed but it had caught the popular imagination and political demonstrations spread across the country. The UK accepted the demands and, in January 1964, introduced a new constitution giving the country internal self- government, and organising elections. UNIP emerged as the majority party and proceeded towards independence.

After the dissolution of the Federation of Rhodesia & Nyasaland, Northern Rhodesia achieved independence on 24th October, 1964 as the Republic of Zambia.

Government

Government Stationery

Services

National Institute of Public Administration

National Institute of Public Administration

Lusaka

The National Institute of Public Administration (NIPA) was established in 1962, initially as a staff training college for the civil service of the then Northern Rhodesia. The decision to establish the college arose out of the perceived dearth of experienced African administrators and skilled personnel, to take over the administration and management of the public service on the country’s attainment of independence on 24th October, 1964. At the time the decision was taken, most, if not all key and strategic positions were occupied by expatriate personnel.

Until 1966, the focus of the college’s programmes was the civil service. However,
conscious of the fact that political independence alone was not adequate to address the aspirations of the people of Zambia, the Government embarked on radical
economic policy reforms.The Government believed that developing and promoting the parastatal sector would enable the people to participate fully in the economic
development of their country.

These developments led to changes in the training requirements of the country, which
influenced the college to broaden the areas of concentration of its training programmes, to take into account the emerging training needs of commerce and
industry. In the light of this new and broader agenda, the name of the college was changed from Staff Training College to National Institute of Public Administration
(NIPA).

Therefore, in line with the Public Service Reform Programme (PSRP) introduced in
1993, the Institute was restructured along with other government ministries and
organisations. It underwent various processes from 1993 to 1997, culminating in the enactment of the NIPA Act, No. 15 of 1998 which paved the way for the transformation
of NIPA from a conventional government training institution, into an autonomous and self-financing one.

It began its operations as new NIPA in January, 2000.

References

  • AJPAM Vol XVI, No. 1 • January 2005
Contributors
  • James Gavin

FB

Government Stationery: British South Africa Company

Government Stationery

British South Africa Company

On Postal Service
1 2 3 22