John Adams Fawdry

John Adams Fawdry

1901-1967

John A Fawdry was the Inspector of Mines in Tanganyika. On 3rd June, 1938 he was appointed as the Inspector of Mines with the Department of Mines in Northern Rhodesia. He returned to Tanganyika in 1950.

References

  • The Mining Magazine, 1950

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Northern Rhodesia: Department of Mines

Northern Rhodesia

Mines Office

In 1924, when the British South Africa Company was relieved of its political obligations in Northern Rhodesia, the Company continued to manage a wide range of agricultural, mining and commercial interests. On 23rd October, 1964 when Northern Rhodesia achieved Independence, the company agreed to surrender its mineral rights claims in return for £4,000,000 (half of which was paid by the UK and half by Zambia).

Forms

People

Northern Rhodesia

Northern Rhodesia

Northern Rhodesia was initially administered by the British South Africa Company (BSAC), under two protectorates; North-Western Rhodesia and North-Eastern Rhodesia. Although under the BSAC charter it had features of a charter colony, the BSAC’s treaties with local rulers and British legislation gave it the status of a protectorate. In 1911 the two protectorates amalgamated to form Northern Rhodesia.

From 1924 it was administered by the British Government as a protectorate under similar conditions to other British-administered protectorates, and the special provisions required when it was administered by BSAC were terminated.

The territory attracted a relatively small number of European settlers, but from the time these first secured political representation, they agitated for white minority rule, either as a separate entity or associated with Southern Rhodesia and possibly Nyasaland. The mineral wealth of Northern Rhodesia made full amalgamation attractive to Southern Rhodesian politicians, but the British Government preferred a looser association to include Nyasaland. This was intended to protect Africans in Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland from discriminatory Southern Rhodesian laws.

The Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland formed in 1953 was intensely unpopular among the vast African majority and its formation hastened calls for majority rule. As a result of this pressure, the country became independent in 1964 as Zambia.

Departments

British South Africa Company: Commercial Branch – Estates Department

British South Africa Company

Estates Department

In 1908, the Commercial Branch of the British South Africa Company (B.S.A.C.) was established to administer land and agricultural development. The Estates Department, within the Commercial Branch, was set-up to promote European settlement and process applications for land.

References

  • A History of Southern Africa – John D Omer-Cooper

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Chaplin High School

Chaplin High School

Gweru

Seven children reported for school in October 1902 when the school was first started. At that time, it was called the Trinity Church School as the building was in the Trinity Church of Gwelo. The first headmaster was Mr Watkinson while Miss Coates-Palgrave was the Assistant to the headmaster. The following January, 16 children moved to the current school grounds.

In 1909, Mr A McDonald was appointed as the headmaster of the school which had been renamed the Gwelo Public School. He continued as the headmaster of the school until 1927 when he retired.

In 1911, the government built a schoolhouse which was the first school hostel in the country. This schoolhouse was later renamed Duthie House after being opened by Mr George Duthie FRSE. By 1914, the first school magazine was printed.

In 1923, the first girls hostel Maitland House was opened by Sir Drummond Chaplin and the school was renamed Chaplin. In 1928, Coghlan House was opened with Lenfesty being opened in 1950. In 1937, the seniors and the juniors were separated, which was the start of Cecil John Rhodes Primary School.

On 7 July 1953, The Queens Gate was opened by The Queen Mother as part of the 1953 Royal Tour.

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National Milling Company Ltd

National Milling Company Ltd

Lusaka

 

After Zambia gained its independence on 24th October, 1964 the government of the Republic of Zambia nationalised most industries which then saw National Milling Company Limited operating as a government parastatal under the Industrial Development Corporation of Zambia Ltd (INDECO) group of companies.  This was a body formed by the government to oversee the operations of all companies that were nationalised.

The coming of multi party politics in 1991 saw the privatisation of most state owned enterprises and during this period National Milling Company Limited was privatised and purchased by Namib Mills. The new owners faced a lot of challenges and were eventually forced to close the company.

In 1998, Seaboards and Overseas Trading group purchased National Milling Corporation.

Contributors
  • James Gavin

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