1937 – George VI Coronation

George VI Coronation

The coronation of George VI and Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon as King and Queen of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth and as Emperor and Empress of India took place at Westminster Abbey, London, on 12 May 1937.

George VI ascended the throne upon the abdication of his brother, Edward VIII, on 11 December 1936, three days before his 41st birthday. Edward’s coronation had been planned for 12th May 1937 and it was decided to continue with his brother and sister-in-law’s coronation on the same date. It remained a largely conservative affair and closely followed the ceremonial of George V’s coronation in 1911.

The event was designed to be not only a sacred anointing and formal crowning, but also a public spectacle, which was also planned as a display of the British Empire. May 1937 included a programme of royal events lasting nearly the entire month to commemorate and mark the occasion.

The media also played an important part in broadcasting this show of pageantry and imperialism to the Empire, which marked this coronation as an important event in the history of television, being the world’s first major outside broadcast. It was also the first coronation to be filmed, as well as the first to be broadcast on radio.

Stamp Releases

Souvenir Covers

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1937 – George VI Coronation: Souvenir Covers

1937 – George VI Coronation

Souvenir Covers

A Souvenir
Coronation Souvenir
Coronation Souvenir Envelope – Southern Rhodesia
Souvenir Envelope
Special Souvenir Cover
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The Boy Scouts Association

The Boy Scouts Association

Bulawayo

The origins of the Scouting Association can be traced back to the Second Matabele War when Robert Baden-Powell and Federick Russell Burnham, the American born Chief of Scouts for the British Army first met and begun a lifelong friendship. Burnham had been a scout practically his entire life in the United States when he went to Africa in 1893 to scout for Cecil Rhodes on the Cape-to-Cairo Railway. 

In mid-June 1896, during their joint scouting patrols in the Matopos Hills, Burnham began teaching Baden-Powell woodcraft, inspiring him and giving him the plan for both the program and the code of honor of Scouting for Boys. These skills eventually formed the basis of what is now called scoutcraft, the fundamentals of Scouting.

Both men recognised that wars in Africa were changing markedly and the British Army needed to adapt; so during their joint scouting missions, Baden-Powell and Burnham discussed the concept of a broad training programme in woodcraft for young men, rich in exploration, tracking, fieldcraft, and self-reliance.

In 1909 three boys, having acquired a copy of Scouting for Boys decided to become scouts. These three boys were the start of the 1st Bulawayo (Pioneer) Boy Scout Group. By 1910 the group began to take shape, under the leadership of the Rev. T.O.Beattie. He held meetings twice weekly in a small tin hut, nicknamed the “Bishop’s Palace”.

Scouting grew quickly and in 1924 Rhodesia and Nyasaland sent a large contingent to the second World Scout Jamboree in Ermelunden, Denmark. The great popularity of the Boy Scout movement in Rhodesia was due to its outdoor program such as hiking, camping, cooking and pioneering, which was unusual in the protectorate. Additionally, the training and progressive badge system was targeted towards helping others, leading to responsible citizenship.

Because of the prevailing circumstances earlier in the 20th century, a separate movement was established for black Africans called “Pathfinders”. By the 1950s the time was considered to merge both movements into one Scout Association, as was done with the South African Scout Association.

During the years of 1960-1979, Scouting in Rhodesia lost a large number of members in the outlying rural areas. Accordingly, the revival and expansion of Scouting in these areas is a prime target at this time.

In 1980, after independence, it became known as the Zimbabwe Boy Scouts Association and became an independent member of the World Scout Conference.

Activities

Events

References

Contributors
  • James Gavin
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Royal Tour: 1934 Prince George – Commemorative Covers

Royal Tour

1934 – Commemorative Covers

 

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Scout Stamp Collectors Club

Scout Stamp Collectors Club

The Scout & Guide Stamps Club was founded as the Scout Stamp Collectors Club (SSCC) in 1957 as a result of the increased interest created by the numerous stamp issues commemorating the Baden-Powell Centenary and the Golden Jubilee of Scouting.  The first meeting was held on February 20th 1957 at the Headquarters of the International Bureau in London followed by an open meeting at the 9th World Jamboree at Sutton Coldfield.

Club membership exceeds 300 from over 30 countries and extends to collectors of Scout and Guide stamps, postal history of Scout & Guide events, special postmarks, slogans and meter cancellations, labels (seals) and postcards.

Membership is open to anyone who is interested in this popular thematic subject and close co-operation is maintained with similar clubs in the U.S.A. and many European countries.

The leading collectors of the world, specialising in Scout and Guide thematics, are members of the SGSC and their expert knowledge and advice is available to fellow members.

Events

Reference

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1980 – 1st Commissioner’s Conference in Zimbabwe

Scout Stamp Collectors Club

1st Commissioner’s Conference in Zimbabwe

With the achievement of independence in 1980, the Zimbabwe Boy Scout Association was able to register directly with the World Scout Bureau (WOSM) and not through the United Kingdom, as in the past.

In the Scout Movement, a commissioner is the person whose role it is to oversee a Scout association’s programs, usually within a particular geographic area. Normally, commissioners are volunteers. In some Scout associations, the term Executive Commissioner is used to refer to a paid staff member.

The 1st Commissioner’s Conference in Zimbabwe was held on 5th July, 1980 in Harare.

References

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1947 – Princess Elizabeth’s 21st Birthday

Princess Elizabeth’s 21st Birthday

Cape Town

On 21st April 1947, Princess Elizabeth celebrated her 21st birthday while on tour with her parents and younger sister in South Africa. In a speech broadcast on the radio from Cape Town, the Princess dedicated her life to the service of the Commonwealth.

The speech was written by Dermot Morrah, a 50yr old journalist. Sent by the Times to report on it, the King and his heir presumptive realised that something ought to be done about her 21st birthday. She would make a broadcast speech to the Commonwealth and Dermot was tasked to write it. The speech contained one of the most quoted passages of the Queen:

I declare before you all that my whole life, whether it be long or short, shall be devoted to your service and the service of our great imperial family to which we all belong.

Originally the draft letter was considered lost until it turned up in a bar.

Reference

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Royal Tour: 1947 Royal Family – Commercial Covers (Black R Cachet)

Royal Tour

1947 – Commercial Covers (Black R Cachet)

 

 

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