1982 – First Day of Harare Post Office

First Day of Harare Post Office

19 July 1982

 

The City of Salisbury was officially changed to the City of Harare on 18 April 1982, the second anniversary of Zimbabwean independence. It took its name from the village near Harare Kopje of the Shona chief Neharawa, whose nickname was “he who does not sleep”. Prior to independence, Harare was the name of the black residential area now known as Mbare.

In 1982, Salisbury Post Office changed its name to Harare Post Office.

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1982 – Last Day of Salisbury Post Office

Last Day of Salisbury Post Office

18 July 1982

The City of Salisbury was officially changed to the City of Harare on 18 April 1982, the second anniversary of Zimbabwean independence. It took its name from the village near Harare Kopje of the Shona chief Neharawa, whose nickname was “he who does not sleep”. Prior to independence, Harare was the name of the black residential area now known as Mbare.

In 1982, Salisbury Post Office changed its name to Harare Post Office.

Commemorative Covers

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1981- First Anniversary of Independence

First Anniversary of Independence

18 April 1981

On 18 April 1981, Zimbabwe celebrated its first anniversary of independence. As part of the celebrations, Nigeria donated $10 million to the government for staff development programs.

Much of the independence festivities were strained with issues between tribes. At an independence-day luncheon, Robert Mugabe complained that some foreign journalists had blown Zimbabwe’s post-independence travails far out of proportion. Specifically, he criticized them for raising the specter of civil war.

Commemorative Covers

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1981 – UMPHLEX 81

UMPHLEX 81

24 October 1981

UMPHLEX 81 was hosted by the Manicaland Philatelic Society in 1981.

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1980 – International Economic Resources Conference on Zimbabwe

International Economic Resources Conference on Zimbabwe

1-5 September 1980 

International Economic Resources Conference on Zimbabwe was held in Salisbury between 1-5 September 1980.

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1983 – Last Day of Validity of Rhodesian Stamps

Last Day of Validity of Rhodesian Stamps

16 October 1983

On 16 October 1983 postage stamps bearing the name Rhodesia became invalidated for use in Zimbabwe. Rhodesia was first introduced as a name on postage stamps in 1909, marking 74 years of the use of the name for postal purposes.

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1980 – Zimbabwe International Trade Fair

Zimbabwe International Trade Fair

3-11 May 1980

In 1980, the Zimbabwe Rhodesia International Trade Fair became the Zimbabwe International Trade Fair. The management was taken on by the Zimbabwe International Trade Fair Company.

The fair was held at Bulawayo and had over 100 permanent buildings, pavilions and halls over 29ha, attracting foreign and African interests.

Commemorative Covers

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1980 – Last Day of Zimbabwe-Rhodesia

Last Day of Zimbabwe-Rhodesia

17 April 1980

Zimbabwe regained its independence from the United Kingdom on 17 April 1980.

Canaan Banana, a Methodist minister and theologian, became the first President of Zimbabwe on 18 April 1980. He stepped down in 1987 so that Robert Mugabe, who reformed the presidency from ceremonial office into an executive one, could succeed him. Banana then worked as an Organisation of African Unity diplomat and also taught at the University of Zimbabwe.

Commemorative Covers

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1980 – First Day of Zimbabwe

First Day of Zimbabwe

18 April 1980

Zimbabwe-Rhodesia gained official independence as Zimbabwe on 18 April 1980.

The Government held independence celebrations in Rufaro stadium in Salisbury. Lord Christopher Soames, the last Governor of Southern Rhodesia, watched as Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, gave a farewell salute and the Rhodesian Signal Corps played “God Save the Queen”.

Many foreign dignitaries also attended, including Prime Minister Indira Gandhi of India, President Shehu Shagari of Nigeria, President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia, President Seretse Khama of Botswana, and Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser of Australia, representing the Commonwealth of Nations. Bob Marley sang ‘Zimbabwe’, a song he wrote, at the government’s invitation in a concert at the country’s independence festivities.

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1913 – Extraordinary General Meeting of the British South Africa Company

Extraordinary General Meeting of the B.S.A.C.

27 February 1913

The British South Africa Company 1913 extraordinary general meeting took place in London in 1913.

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Contributors
  • Walter Herdzik

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